What You Need To Do In Case A Person Experiences Seizures

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Consider this scenario

A person beside you suddenly becomes stiff, goes unconscious and falls to the floor.  The next thing you know, he is already having some jerky movements along with the presence of a bluish tinge around his mouth. You also notice that the person is having irregular bowel or bladder control as he continues to twitch on the floor. What should you do? Should you panic and bring him to the nearest hospital?

If you have a good knowledge about emergency conditions, you will know that the jerky movements are caused by seizures. The bluish discoloration in the mouth area is due to lack of oxygen and irregular breathing. The irregular bladder and bowel is also associated with the episodes of seizures. As first aid providers, it is important to know what to do in case a child suffers from episodic attacks of seizures.

Things To Do:

Stay calm and assist the victim during the entire time he is having seizures.

Remove objects away from the patient to prevent harm or injury

Remove objects away from the patient to prevent harm or injury

Check the surroundings if there are any nearby objects/furniture that might fall or harm the person or if you are already in a safe location, do not attempt to move him further.  Call the ambulance if he is harmed during seizures.

Place anything that could cushion the head of the victim, such as a pillow.

Take note of the time that the seizures have started (the loss of consciousness and jerky movements usually last for three to five minutes before the child regains consciousness). If the seizure, however, lasts longer than five minutes, you should call the emergency hotline.

Never put anything in the mouth, because this may cause choking or even induce vomiting.

Place the patient on a side lying position so that any mucus or vomit will be drained out from the mouth normally.

Patients usually wake up or regain conscious after the seizure has stopped. Seek for professional emergency assistance if in case the person does not wake up after the seizure.

Other reasons to call an ambulance:

If it is the first time of the child to have seizures

If the patient is diabetic or pregnant

If another seizure takes place even before the patient regains consciousness from his first seizure

Enroll In First Aid

Seizures are usually not life-threatening or critical as long as you know how to manage one. Having the right knowledge about seizures is important to help a victim in case of an emergency. Check out your location for more information about first aid for seizures.

Related Video On Seizure Management:

[youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MPJauo4DdY”]

Sources:

“Epilepsy and First Aid for Seizures.” Web MD. Retrieved online on June 22, 2014 from http://www.webmd.com/epilepsy/guide/first-aid-seizures

“What to do when someone has a seizure.” Epilepsy Action. Retrieved online on June 22, 2014 from https://www.epilepsy.org.uk/info/firstaid

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  • All childcarefirstaid.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.